A Tale of Two Buildings

A recent Washington Post story noted how green construction has become a common trend for new office buildings, with one-third of all new office space completed in 2011 being designated “green.” But beyond the energy savings that come with a commitment to high performance standards, owners of these green buildings have also had an easier time leasing the space because of the demand from companies wanting a work environment that will mitigate energy costs and reduce the impact of their environmental footprints.

The article notes a clear difference between the occupancy rates of green buildings and traditional buildings in Washington, D.C. For example, almost two-thirds of all office space built in D.C. since 2009 has been either LEED-certified or Energy Star efficient, and now those buildings boast a lower vacancy rate than their typical counterparts (17 percent versus 20.7 percent).

At Trane, we know that the benefits of high performance buildings go beyond cutting energy costs or reducing carbon footprints: they also contribute heavily to employee morale and productivity.

For example, based on a review of more than 1,500 studies, the Center for Building Performance at Carnegie Mellon University confirmed that indoor environmental qualities like lighting, ventilation and thermal comfort significantly impact employee productivity and performance. And when critical building system performance declines or deteriorates, personal contributions suffer as well.

The Trane approach to creating a high performance building outcome considers the whole building. It starts with a detailed consultation and assessment to address the factors that contribute to organizational success and develops and implements a plan that helps customers achieve their business missions.

With this comprehensive approach to green building construction, we know our customers will not only experience lower energy costs and smaller carbon footprints, but increased productivity and a stronger team.

 

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