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Oil Furnace

A furnace is a part of the heating system in which the combustion of fossil fuel and transfer of heat occurs. Furnaces can be fueled by natural gas or oil.

What It Is

An oil furnace is the heating component in some systems in colder weather climates, most commonly in the northeastern United States. It converts oil to heat. Another option is a gas furnace that uses natural gas as its fuel instead of oil. The main components to a furnace include burners and heat exchanger, blower and controls. Trane gas and oil furnaces are built to perform again and again, year after year. Beyond performance, we also provide options for energy-efficient operation.

How It Works

From a storage tank, oil is pumped into the furnace where it is turned into a mist, sprayed through the blast tube and ignited. The fine droplets mixed with the air allow it to burn very efficiently. The flame heats the air within a heat exchanger, and the combusted gasses exit through a flue or chimney. Air from the house is drawn through the ductwork, past the heat exchanger and back out of the vents in the house. In most modern systems, the air flows through a filter, which removes any impurities.

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